Sunday, November 13, 2005

Headlines and Walnuts

The headline today reads: Fish Numbers Plummet in Warming Pacific

If you follow the above link to the article, you will find an article detailing the catastrophic collapse in sea and bird life taking place in our own Pacific Ocean due to the warming of the waters. Go ahead, read it.

Or perhaps you could read this one: Ripples of Global Warming Spread Outward which details the increase in insects and diseases (like malaria) taking place around the world. They do not mention the annoying fruit flies feeding on Walnut husks here in Upper Lake, California... insects which are usually are gone by this time of year. Where is our first frost? I'm rooting for winter weather to arrive. It is late.

How about: Melting Mountains: How Climate Change is Destroying the World's Most Spectacular Landscapes

Or: Greenhouse Gases 'To Rise By 52%' an article which I think is WRONG because I believe we will run out of oil first (but not before we've passed the magic number of 400ppm carbon dioxide which guarantees global climate collapse will happen. We are at 384 ppm this year, by the way.)

It's official: the Walnut crop at this Upper lake orchard was 10% of last year due in part to the late rains. It rained heavily at the end of June in Northern California this past year. Do you remember that happening in earlier years? I don't.

60,000 species of life will become extinct this year, mainly due to climate change. And another 60,000 or more next year. And the year after that. Plants and animals. Gone forever, unless we save the seeds, I suppose.

In the meantime, companies are developing a "terminator gene" and releasing it into nature in the form of crop seeds. The gene prevents farmers from saving seeds; they will have to buy new seeds each year from seed and chemical conglomerates who claim that this will solve the worlds hunger problems. I'll bet it won't.

What do you think?

Not only have we lost track of caring for the seventh generation, we have stopped caring for our own. What will it take for us to begin to care, and more importantly, to ACT.

As for me, I wonder what the children of this generation will eat. So today, in a profound act of hope, I will wander into the orchard and spread straw to enrich the soil for next season.

Perhaps I will plant a fig tree.